Arizona's Greenspace Honored

All the olive trees on the western part of campus are included as heritage trees, and the oldest are north of the Arizona State Museum. Planted by Robert Forbes in the late 1800's, they were part of his trials of arid lands crop plants brought to Tucson from around the world. (Photo courtesy Campus Arboretum)
All the olive trees on the western part of campus are included as heritage trees, and the oldest are north of the Arizona State Museum. Planted by Robert Forbes in the late 1800's, they were part of his trials of arid lands crop plants brought to Tucson from around the world. (Photo courtesy Campus Arboretum)

The Nebraska-based Arbor Day Foundation has named the University of Arizona a 2011 Tree Campus USA school in honor of the UA's "commitment to effective community forestry management." The UA has garned the award for three straight years.
 
Tanya Quist, an assistant professor of practice in the School of Plant Sciences and director of the UA Campus Arboretum, will receive the award, which is sponsored by Toyota.
 
The Arbor Day Foundation said the UA achieved the designation by meeting its five core standards required for sustainable campus forestry: a tree advisory committee, a campus tree-care plan, dedicated annual expenditures for its campus tree program, an Arbor Day observance and the sponsorship of student service-learning projects.
 
"Students throughout the country are passionate about sustainability and community improvement, which makes the University of Arizona's emphasis on well-maintained and healthy trees so important," said John Rosenow, chief executive of the Arbor Day Foundation.

"By achieving Tree Campus USA recognition for the third year in a row, Arizona will continue to set an example for other colleges and universities and give students a chance to give back to both their campus community and the community at-large," Rosenow said.
 
The UA, in fact, is the oldest continually managed green space in Arizona, and is one of more than 100 college and university campuses around the country with a Tree Campus USA designation. The Campus Arboretum, has cataloged and manages several thousand trees across the University grounds in central Tucson.

Some of them include the olives and other trees brought to campus more than a century ago by Robert Forbes, the first dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

Read more from this April 26 UANews article at http://uanews.org/node/45568

Date released: 
Apr 27 2012
Contact: 
Tanya Quist